Tag Archive | schedule

On Staying Physically Fit

Getting to the gym can be a strenuous task.  Just thinking about being winded and our bodies aching afterward can turn a lot of us off. In this post I intend to explain some ways that may get rid of that haunting feeling whenever someone says the word “gym.” There are tons of benefits to staying in shape: you don’t have to do it alone, there are easy ways to stay motivated, and you don’t have to be there for five hours at a time. Stay on task and you will be in and out faster than you can say Oxford English Dictionary!

Part of the college experience is seeing what life is like without anyone reminding you or telling you to do anything. We don’t have to get up and exercise, but there are plenty of reasons to get up and go. Working out is a great stress reliever. In college, we deal with constant due dates, annoying room mates, evil teachers and a million other things that stress us out. Holding on to the built up stress from all these things is unhealthy. Getting in a good workout can help release some of that anxiety. Working out will also help focus your mind on the designated tasks at hand. Which will help eliminate things like wandering unproductive thoughts and sleep reading. Sleep reading is when you are reading something, but you are thinking about something else therefore you are not retaining the information. That is the worst way to study. Go to the gym and come home with your energy focused on what’s important. Stay with your workout, you’ll start to look better and feel better about yourself.

Good friends can make you feel better in almost any situation, so why not go the the gym with them? Going to the gym with a friend gives you a good sense of urgency. Nobody wants to disappoint a good friend. You will make sure you’re at the gym, ready to workout and you may push yourself a little harder just because you know your friend is watching. Now, this doesn’t have to be a competition, but having a friend or a gym buddy is good motivation to stick with your regiment.

Staying motivated is a common issue especially when your workload begins to pile up. Your work is the most important thing, that’s why you’re in school, so it’s easy to skip workouts when a semester begins to pick up momentum. That’s not a problem, the problem comes when you are using your workload as an excuse. You don’t have to be in the gym for hours at a time. You can get in a great workout within 30-45 minutes. There are plenty of regiments online to use and I’m sure if you ask someone at your school gym they can recommend something for you to do.

Lastly, go to the gym with the betterment of your health in mind. Don’t get discouraged by other people! That means don’t worry about the behemoth that can curl the service desk, don’t worry about the slender goddess that has been running on the treadmill at top speed for an hour and a half, and don’t worry about the guy walking around with a shirt that exposes his nipples just because he can. You can’t let things like this bother you because that is who these people are. Get in, do your workout and get out. Just like you don’t want anyone to judge you, don’t judge anybody else. Tolerance is a two-way street and it is only fair if there are no exceptions to the rules. College is not the easiest time to stay in shape, but there is no excuse for not trying to stay in shape at the very least. Put aside time to go to the gym and you will love yourself at the end of the semester.

On Time Management

In case you feel as though you’ll be overwhelmed by college, relax; it’s easier than you think.

Most colleges require around 15 units a semester (or 12 units a quarter) to graduate in four years. Units can typically be understood as the number of hours a week you will be in class. If you compare that to the 30-35 hours a week spent in high school, there should be no reason you shouldn’t graduate in a timely manner. Yes, classes are harder than those you took in high school and will require more time for homework, but given the amount of free time you get, it’s more than reasonable.

Accordingly, if there’s one thing you will need to get used to in college, it is the amount of free time you’ll have. Getting a job will help offset the free time and besides; there are few things better than a steady paycheck, whatever the size.

One of the main problems I saw in college, was the ways in which students abused their free time. As soon as classes got out for the day or for the week, my classmates would immediately immerse themselves in partying or video games that would last until hours before class began again, leaving little to no time for studying or homework. I’ve witnessed numerous people fail classes because they were not able to find time to put in the work, despite the substantial amount of time they were given.

When I would get out of class, I would head back to my apartment and finish most of the homework assigned to me that day, and only after that I would feel ready to begin socializing with friends. This routine worked well for my first year, then I began giving myself a little more leeway as I became more comfortable with it and because my work hours didn’t always allow me to do so. Regardless, I still completed assignments and papers as soon as I could. I would suggest you try this first semester to avoid being overwhelmed by deadlines and due dates, instead of waiting until it’s too late. After you get used to this system, try adjusting it to see what works best for you.

Now don’t get me wrong, partying and hanging out with friends is great, but there is a happy medium between socializing and studying. Though it may vary from person to person, it is out there, and finding it for yourself is well worth the satisfaction.

On Registering for Classes

Registering for classes had to be my least favorite part of college. During the last month of the semester, when registration for the next term became available, worried students could only talk about the lack of seats in a needed class and how their registration time was inconvenient. For freshmen and sophomores, it is typically the worst. Since they’re farthest away from graduation, they typically get the scraps after the upper class-men have taken all the better classes; but that’s just the way it goes, it gets easier.

If you’re new to registering for classes; don’t worry, there are a couple of ways in which you can optimize your schedule for your benefit and make the whole process a little easier.

A website that I’m sure is mentioned by students on every campus, is Rate My Professors. Here students rate professors from easy to difficult, comment on the best or worst classes of theirs, as well as rate their attractiveness. Though I have used this site before, I often found that students would live by it and not enroll in a class they needed because of information they found. I figured that if I went to classes and did my work, it wouldn’t really matter what professor it was and it worked just fine for me.

Another thing to consider is what time you should schedule your classes. I’ve taken classes that started at seven in the morning, and some that got out around 10 at night; it all depends on what works for you. For most of my semesters, starting from my very first, I decided to schedule my classes for almost every day and during the time I was used to attending school. I had just graduated high school a few months earlier, and figured that it would make for an easy transition to have classes from 8 or 9 a.m. until just before three o’clock. This was great for me, because when I got out, I was done for the day and didn’t have to sit around on campus and do nothing, as many students do.

Also, you must think about your job (if you are lucky enough to have one) and make sure to schedule classes at times that don’t conflict with your job hours (or potential job hours). I would usually draw out a mock planner to see when my best times for class and work would be and go from there.

Now for my last bit of advice for this post, which will probably be told to you at orientation. Your first two years should be focused on GE (General Education), the easy classes that are required for all students. They’re easy and easy to get into, so it should make your first few registration days a little less stressful.