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On Time Management

In case you feel as though you’ll be overwhelmed by college, relax; it’s easier than you think.

Most colleges require around 15 units a semester (or 12 units a quarter) to graduate in four years. Units can typically be understood as the number of hours a week you will be in class. If you compare that to the 30-35 hours a week spent in high school, there should be no reason you shouldn’t graduate in a timely manner. Yes, classes are harder than those you took in high school and will require more time for homework, but given the amount of free time you get, it’s more than reasonable.

Accordingly, if there’s one thing you will need to get used to in college, it is the amount of free time you’ll have. Getting a job will help offset the free time and besides; there are few things better than a steady paycheck, whatever the size.

One of the main problems I saw in college, was the ways in which students abused their free time. As soon as classes got out for the day or for the week, my classmates would immediately immerse themselves in partying or video games that would last until hours before class began again, leaving little to no time for studying or homework. I’ve witnessed numerous people fail classes because they were not able to find time to put in the work, despite the substantial amount of time they were given.

When I would get out of class, I would head back to my apartment and finish most of the homework assigned to me that day, and only after that I would feel ready to begin socializing with friends. This routine worked well for my first year, then I began giving myself a little more leeway as I became more comfortable with it and because my work hours didn’t always allow me to do so. Regardless, I still completed assignments and papers as soon as I could. I would suggest you try this first semester to avoid being overwhelmed by deadlines and due dates, instead of waiting until it’s too late. After you get used to this system, try adjusting it to see what works best for you.

Now don’t get me wrong, partying and hanging out with friends is great, but there is a happy medium between socializing and studying. Though it may vary from person to person, it is out there, and finding it for yourself is well worth the satisfaction.

On Expectations

Regardless of where you end up going to school, college will not be exactly what you expect it to be. We’ve all seen the films Animal House and Revenge of the Nerds, or viewed one of the many shows that MTV has played over the years to suggest to our young minds what our lives at university will be. You’ve invariably built up some notion of wild parties, free-flowing alcohol, and unforgettable antics that somehow combine to form this four-year extravaganza. While I promise you that this does exist somewhat at every school I have visited; this is not college. If you go in only expecting this, you’re in for a wake-up call.

College is better. For a very short four years of our lives we are given the chance to use the amenities of giant institutions across the nation. The amount of resources that school’s put at a student’s fingertips is absolutely astounding. From endless library access, to a whole host of professors and classes conveying light on every imaginable subject; the chance to gain knowledge is easily there.

I’m sure this does not impress many of you. You’re thinking something along the lines of “I’m going for the college experience, not just to learn! I don’t care about libraries!” Sure, I firmly believe that the importance of college is not academic learning. But ignoring the academics all together has gotten many of my fellow students in heaps of trouble, so I thought I’d try to get you to realize the value of some of the resources before you forget to utilize them. The faculty and staff are literally there to help you, don’t be afraid to ask them any question.

But back to expectations, it’s probably safer to lower your own. That isn’t to say that college won’t be a life-altering experience, but it is simply your own journey. For the next few short years of your life, you’ll be able to completely redefine yourself and fully grow in to what you want to be. You’ll get to meet people from all around the world and try out a myriad of different activities with little to no real world consequences. You want to play a unique sport? You want to try your hand at being a painter? You want to become a published physicist? Then do it! College not only allows for this, but also encourages it.

The main thing to take away is that everyone’s college experience is unique. With such an opportunity ahead of you, its important to utilize all of the benefits of being a student. You don’t have to be a character out of some party movie, but you also don’t have to be so studious that you have no life. Your education is not only about the grades your earn, but also about the life lessons your learn.  Live a little, learn a little, grow a little and simply enjoy it.

Congratulations, you made it to college! Now don’t screw it up.

Teach Me How to College is here to help you have a successful college career and help you not screw up this great opportunity. Best of luck, students.