Archive by Author | nukecomb

On Dining Halls and the Freshman Fifteen

One of the most obvious problems facing incoming freshmen who are planning on living on campus is the struggle of nutrition and of learning to control their own eating habits. Most schools attempt to thwart this conundrum by offering various meal plans that allow students to purchase meals at the various dining halls located on campus.

As time has progressed, most student bodies on campuses across the country have led initiatives to force their schools to offer healthy options for students. The problem is that along with the promising nutrients of all the healthy options, students seem to have little to no control over their own consumption.
Healthy Options at the University of California, Irvine Dining Hall

From my own experiences in the dining hall, I would often see students bypass the leaner options and head straight towards the pizza and burger station. My freshman peers would walk to their tables with multiple plates of food, washing their greasy meals down with endless cups of the various sodas that flowed freely. Even if they were full halfway through the meal, they would most often continue eating the food they had gotten in an effort to not waste anything. After months of doing this they easily put on quite a few extra pounds.

So, what is the easiest way to fix this? I need to preface this by saying that I am in no way a dietitian or nutritionist, but simply a student who successfully made it through the first years of college in a relatively healthy state. The main way to combat this overconsumption is to simply only grab a single plate of food at a time. This forces you to have to continually choose whether or not you want to eat more, rather than simply having all of the food in front of you. Most dining halls that I have visited are wholly fine with students going back and forth between tables and the food areas, so no additional charges are levied. Getting into the habit of forcing yourself to a single plate can easily help keep off the excess weight.

Students who live on campus are offered meal plans of various sizes, and most of my fellow students made the expensive mistake of purchasing the largest meal plan. It is easy to have the mindset of “Of course I’ll need to be able to eat at the dining hall three times a day!” More often than not, you’ll skip a meal each day because of classes, outings, or just pure apathy. Unless you are absolutely certain that you’ll need to eat in the dining hall for all three meals each day, go for a smaller and ultimately cheaper plan. Almost everyone I knew at the end of each school quarter had extra meal points remaining, which was a complete waste of money.

Living away from home for the first time can be an amazing experience, but it is easy to ruin your body and time by eating terribly in the campus dining halls. Avoid the pitfalls of overpaying and always remember to stick to a single plate.

On Expectations

Regardless of where you end up going to school, college will not be exactly what you expect it to be. We’ve all seen the films Animal House and Revenge of the Nerds, or viewed one of the many shows that MTV has played over the years to suggest to our young minds what our lives at university will be. You’ve invariably built up some notion of wild parties, free-flowing alcohol, and unforgettable antics that somehow combine to form this four-year extravaganza. While I promise you that this does exist somewhat at every school I have visited; this is not college. If you go in only expecting this, you’re in for a wake-up call.

College is better. For a very short four years of our lives we are given the chance to use the amenities of giant institutions across the nation. The amount of resources that school’s put at a student’s fingertips is absolutely astounding. From endless library access, to a whole host of professors and classes conveying light on every imaginable subject; the chance to gain knowledge is easily there.

I’m sure this does not impress many of you. You’re thinking something along the lines of “I’m going for the college experience, not just to learn! I don’t care about libraries!” Sure, I firmly believe that the importance of college is not academic learning. But ignoring the academics all together has gotten many of my fellow students in heaps of trouble, so I thought I’d try to get you to realize the value of some of the resources before you forget to utilize them. The faculty and staff are literally there to help you, don’t be afraid to ask them any question.

But back to expectations, it’s probably safer to lower your own. That isn’t to say that college won’t be a life-altering experience, but it is simply your own journey. For the next few short years of your life, you’ll be able to completely redefine yourself and fully grow in to what you want to be. You’ll get to meet people from all around the world and try out a myriad of different activities with little to no real world consequences. You want to play a unique sport? You want to try your hand at being a painter? You want to become a published physicist? Then do it! College not only allows for this, but also encourages it.

The main thing to take away is that everyone’s college experience is unique. With such an opportunity ahead of you, its important to utilize all of the benefits of being a student. You don’t have to be a character out of some party movie, but you also don’t have to be so studious that you have no life. Your education is not only about the grades your earn, but also about the life lessons your learn.  Live a little, learn a little, grow a little and simply enjoy it.