On Deciding Your Major

If you are lucky enough to know what you want you want to major in, we applaud you. The rest of us are not quite as fortunate. However, here is an important bit of information you should know that no one ever bothered to tell you when discussing your college career: It’s okay not to know what you want to do for the rest of your life.

In fact, it may surprise you to find out how good of company you are in by not knowing. According to the Northwest Education Loan Association (NELA), two-thirds of college freshman begin college without a chosen major. Even then, around sixty percent of students change their major at least once. Ohio University claims that on average students change their major three times.

Take a deep breath. Choosing a major is not an easy feat. So here are a few pointers that might help you along the way to deciding which major is right for you:

Explore your options. Most colleges offer a career exploration class that focuses on helping you decide what major you would excel in. It’s great for freshman, but upperclassmen are not out-of-place in these courses.

Workshop it Out. Universities and colleges also hold workshops for career placement. These are generally free for current students and can be a great way of getting a feel for what path you should take.

Take a Test. There are loads of websites and quizzes geared towards helping you decide what career paths you may enjoy. These are great because they use personality questions to determine like-minded career choices and are free. Here are a few to sample: CareeerPath and CareerTest.

Audit a Class (or Two). Auditing a few classes that deal with your major. Auditing is when you sit in for a class with professor approval without getting credit for the class. It gives you a taste of what you will be doing in the future. It’s also a great way to network and meet folks who will be going into similar fields before you graduate.

Work for It. Internships you will be working hands on with real companies doing real work. While a lot of internships require a student to be at a junior or senior level, you can find plenty of companies that will accept younger students. Not all internships are paid, but the experience and padding of your future resume will be well worth putting in some unpaid time.

Do what you love. The money will follow. This advice might be the hardest of all to swallow, but it is important. No one wants to work forty or more hours a week doing something they hate, so don’t compromise now. Invest your education into something that interests or inspires you even if you don’t think you can get that weekend vacation house in the Hamptons from it. It will pay off in the long run.

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About Danni

Danni Daniels is a 20-something single mother living in the midwest. She spends her time freelance writing, taking photographs and doodling while still fine tuning her bachelors degree. She is described as being a ball of paradoxes- conservative but liberal, overly cheerful yet brooding and introspective. Currently, Danni runs a number of start up blogs which vary upon her interests and rang from free writing fiction, a mommy blog and a professional freelance writing blog. Cooking, decorating, film, literature, paranormal, college life, parenting, relationships, family and crafts are her current topics of posting.

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